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Psychologist dating former patient

The client became increasingly defensive and resistant to the therapist’s advice, eventually stalking out and leaving an unpaid bill for the last two sessions.

“Know your client before crossing any professional boundaries” is a theme that will recur several times in this lesson.

In the actual case, the client felt embarrassed by the therapist’s brash rejection and later attempted to press ethics charges for “getting him drunk and trying to take advantage.” The charge was not sustained, but the therapist had to endure a difficult inquiry by his peers, and his once-prized student turned against the therapist and was, himself, needlessly harmed. After all, the therapist tried to do the client a favor.

Although one can identify various types of high risk therapists and situations, we also conclude that no one seems immune from temptation.

Psychotherapeutic alliances have peculiar and significant features that require firm professional resolve and self-monitoring.

(See other ways to handle bad online reviews later in this lesson.) The third scenario illustrates one of those situations that can so easily be perceived as a “great deal.” What could possibly go wrong?

The two already experienced how well they worked together. The therapist invested more than he could afford in the client’s business and found the client to be a castigating and controlling boss.

It is not our intention to trivialize the seriousness of the issues.

As part of our disguising process, we also randomly assign various professional designations, earned degrees or licensure status.

The fifth scenario has a couple of unusual features in that the counselor did not know much about the client because the group focused solely on test-taking anxiety as opposed to the more sensitive issues that arise in individual psychotherapy.

Yet, agreeing to meet in a very cozy setting with someone who had come for help, even in a carefully circumscribed way, always holds the potential of putting the therapist in jeopardy.

When the therapist said he wanted out and a return of his investment the client refused, noting that they had signed a valid contract.