Start Dating methods used in archaeology

Dating methods used in archaeology

On the one level, events and individuals are placed in an absolute chronology: the exact years and sometimes even months and days of the events and biographies are known.

The scholar most associated with the rules of stratigraphy (or law of superposition) is probably the geologist Charles Lyell.

For Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean, this method from European prehistory is currently under development in a project based at Vienna.

Archaeologists use many different techniques to determine the age of a particular artifact, site, or part of a site.

Two broad categories of dating or chronometric techniques that archaeologists use are called relative and absolute dating.

Stratigraphy is the oldest of the relative dating methods that archaeologists use to date things.

Typological dating may foster the tendency to assume that each step in development is of about the same time length, but this does not need to be the case in reality.

All living organic materials contain Carbon-14 atoms in a constant number.

Artefacts often have a distinctive style or design, which developed over a period of time.